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Tuesday, February 19, 2008

THE SILK ROUTE ROAD TO TERROR MARKETING IN INDIA






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http://www.ramblingroses.net/zoldsilkr.htm

http://www.indianembassy.org/special/cabinet/Primeminister/2002/pm_june_05_2002.htm

KHYBER PASS

The Khyber Pass combines in one place all the strands of the tapestry we encountered along the Old Silk Road - trade, war, religion, gender politics and multi-national intrigue.

Opening Remarks of Prime Minister Vajpayee at a Press Conference

June 05 2002
Almaty, Kazakhstan

I am happy to meet mediapersons at the end of my first visit to Kazakhstan – indeed, to Central Asia. Historically, this extended neighbourhood of ours has been very close to our hearts. It is linked to India through ties of history, culture and spirituality. With the countries of Central Asia becoming independent, a new geo-political reality, of great significance to us, has come into being in this part of the world after the end of the Cold War. India wishes to strengthen her ties with all the countries of the region, imparting a multi-dimensional character to them. I would call it the new “Silk Route Initiative” of India’s foreign policy, It will seek to build a new Silk Road of Friendship and Cooperation between India and Central Asia.

My visit, which began on June 2, had the principal aim of sharing the desire for peace, prosperity and progress with Kazakhstan, the largest country in the region. During my stay in Almaty, I have seen for myself Kazakhstan’s impressive progress over the last ten years. I have had very friendly meetings with the President of Kazakhstan, Mr. Nulsultan Nazarbaev.

In our bilateral meeting on 3rd June, President Nazarbaev and I reviewed the extremely fast pace of progress in our relations since February, 2002 when he had come to India on a state visit. We have now identified Energy, Information Technology, Pharmaceuticals, Small Scale Industries and Defence Cooperation as areas for special focus. I am glad that both CII and FICCI were also present in Almaty with large delegations. These business leaders informed me that they see great opportunities for Indo-Kazakh economic cooperation. CII and FICCI have both decided to set up an office each in Kazakhstan. I would like this flag of business friendship to be carried to other Central Asian countries as well.

India and Kazakhstan have now set up a Joint Working Group Against International Terrorism and another Agreement to promote Tourism. A Memorandum of Understanding on Military and Technical Cooperation was also signed.

Besides my extensive meetings with the President of Kazakhstan, I also met with the President of Tajikistan, Mr. Emomali Rakhmanov. I was touched by the great warmth shown by President Rakhmanov. He invited me to visit Tajikistan and I have accepted his invitation. I conveyed to him our fraternal greetings to the people of Tajikistan, wishing him success in his country’s struggle against terrorism and extremism.

My meetings with the Presidents of Kazakhstan and Tajikistan have reinforced my conviction that a great opportunity beckons us to work together with all the countries of Central Asia. Together, we should be partners in tomorrow’s mutually beneficial progress. Besides the obvious benefits in cooperation in Energy, there is a strategic logic to our “Silk Route Initiative”.

On the eve of the first CICA Summit, Kazakhstan extended a special gesture to India. President Nazarbaev joined me in naming a beautiful road of Almaty after Mahatma Gandhi. I was deeply touched by this dedication to the Apostle of Peace just before the CICA Summit.

On 4th June, I participated in the “Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia (CICA)”. This Conference was aimed at spreading the message of peace, security and friendship so that peoples of Asia could concentrate on removal of poverty and
promotion of socio-economic development through close bilateral and regional cooperation. This, indeed, was India’s principal motivation behind our unstinted cooperation over the last 10 years in the CICA process. In my address at the Summit, I conveyed the message that
deeper and broader Asian cooperation, with emphasis on conflict-resolution through dialogue, is the key to unleashing the full potential of Asia for peace and development both in our own continent and around the world.

I also shared my hope for a new vision for Asia based on our inheritance of some of the greatest civilizations and spiritual traditions in the world, emphasizing that tolerance and equal respect for all faiths has to be recognized as a universal principle in the new inter-dependent world we live in. In this context, I emphasized the need to defeat the forces of terrorism and religious extremism through an intensified global struggle. I am happy that most participating states had a similar vision for Asia.

I took the opportunity of the CICA summit to convey to the peoples and governments of Asia, India’s deep concern over cross-border terrorism aimed at destabilizing our country. I said that India has taken due note of the repeated assurances from the President of Pakistan to stop infiltration of terrorists into India and all terrorist activities conducted from Pakistani soil in the name of Kashmir. So far, India and the world community have not seen the results of these assurances on the ground. I have clearly conveyed that India is ready for dialogue with Pakistan on all issues, including the issue of Jammu & Kashmir, when cross-border terrorism ends.

Of great significance to India and the entire Asian and global community are the two documents signed at the CICA summit – the “Almaty Act” and the “CICA Declaration on Eliminating Terrorism and Promoting Dialogue Among Civilizations”. I wish to draw the attention of the media to just one of the important commitments enjoined on all the signatories to the Almaty Act.

“Separatism is one of the main threats and challenges to the security and stability, sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity of states. The Member States shall not support on the territory of another Member State any separatist movements and entities, and, if such emerge, not to establish political, economic and other kinds of relations with them, not to allow the territories and communications of the Member States to be used by the above-mentioned movements and entities, and not to render them any kind of economic, financial and other assistance.”

I held warm and friendly bilateral talks with President Vladimir Putin of Russia. I conveyed to him India’s appreciation of Russia’s strong and consistent support for our stand on terrorism. We are keenly looking forward to his visit to India in December.

I had a fruitful bilateral meeting with President Jiang Zemin of China. We discussed bilateral and CICA-related issues.

I was happy to have had the opportunity of meeting Chairman Hamid Karzai of the Interim Administration of Afghanistan. We discussed regional issues including the residual problems of the war against terrorism in that country. We believe that the forthcoming Loya Jirgah will be one more important step in strengthening independence, democracy and peace in Afghanistan.

I also had the opportunity of meeting the President of Turkey, Mr. N. Sezer. We discussed issues of bilateral importance.

Of great significance to India and the entire Asian and global community are the two documents signed at the CICA summit – the “Almaty Act” and the “CICA Declaration on Eliminating Terrorism and Promoting Dialogue Among Civilizations”. I wish to draw the attention of the media to just one of the important commitments enjoined on all the signatories to the Almaty Act.

“Separatism is one of the main threats and challenges to the security and stability, sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity of states. The Member States shall not support on the territory of another Member State any separatist movements and entities, and, if such emerge, not to establish political, economic and other kinds of relations with them, not to allow the territories and communications of the Member States to be used by the above-mentioned movements and entities, and not to render them any kind of economic, financial and other assistance.”

http://www.silkroadstudies.org/new/inside/research/terrorism_conflict.htm


Article no. 2046

Date 23 June 2006
Nathu La: Renewing the India-China Silk Route

Rajeev Ranjan Chaturvedy
Indian Pugwash Society

http://www.ipcs.org/India_articles2.jsp?action=showView&kValue=2060&country=1016&status=article&mod=a

Terrorism is a global phenomenon and cannot be said to have a specific point of origin. However, the roots of much of contemporary terrorism can be traced to the Silk Road region including North East Asia, from where the global network of terrorists expand.

http://www.whatreallyhappened.com/SilkRoad.html

“By 1985, Bin Laden had drawn on his family’s wealth, plus donations received from sympathetic merchant families in the Gulf region, to organize the Islamic Salvation Foundation, or al-Qaida, for this purpose.” – from the CIA report “Usama Bin Ladin: Islamic Extremist Financier”, 1996.

In order to support the Islamic jihad (holy war) against the Soviet Union, the U.S. supported camps for the Islamic mujahedeen, which became schools of Islamic radicalism. Working closely with the CIA in their efforts was a Saudi national named Osama bin Laden, a civil engineer and son of Muhammed Bin Laden, whose family owned the largest construction company in Saudi Arabia, and who had close ties to the Saudi royal family. Osama also worked with the ISI (Inter-Services Intelligence, the Pakistan intelligence agency) to channel funds, arms, and training to the mujahedeen. In 1988, Osama bin Laden, with full knowledge of the U.S. government, created al-Qaeda, which organization served as a conglomerate of Islamic mujahedeen cells spread throughout dozens of countries.

During the course of 2001, President George W. Bush was in negotiations once more with the Taliban. In May of 2001, Secretary of State Colin Powell announced a gift of $43 million to the Taliban, supposedly to help fight the “drug war”.

“To be precise, [opium is] being produced in the Taliban areas. You are talking to someone who has studied it. Whether there is some minor amount of heroin and opium being produced in the other areas is debatable. There is some obviously being produced everywhere, but the major fields that are being produced are in the Taliban-controlled areas.” – Dana Rohrabacher, California, speaking at the House Subcommittee of U.S. Interests in the Central Asian Republics, February 12, 1988.

Osama bin Laden

Osama bin Laden is the son of Mohammed bin Laden, the head of a vast construction empire, whose family also has vast interests in other areas. During the Soviet-Afghan war, the Royal Family of Saudi Arabia—friends of the bin Laden family—wanted to show fellow Muslims their support and commitment. Mohammed bin Laden was also helping to fund the Afghan war. So, when Osama wanted to go there to join the fight, his family and his government supported him.

Osama brought in engineers and construction equipment to assist in the conflict. With the help of the CIA, he built training facilities for the muhajeddeen. He became disillusioned, however, with the bickering among warlords and returned to Saudi Arabia, where he founded a welfare program for Afghan war veterans.

When Iraq invaded Kuwait, Osama lobbied the Royal Family to organize a force from Afghan war veterans to fight Saddam Hussein.

Instead, King Fahd turned to the U.S. Osama openly criticized the Royal Family and fought to get religious scholars to back rulings against non-Muslims being allowed into the Islamic "holy land". In 1992, Bin Laden went to Sudan to assist in the Islamic revolution there. He gathered veterans of the Afghan war, which were disgusted that the U.S. military was allowed to remain in the Gulf once the war had ended.

On several separate occasions, Sudan offered to turn over their intelligence files on Osama bin Laden, and even to extradite the man himself to the U.S. government, who wanted Osama in connection with the U.S. Embassy and U.S.S. Cole bombings. U.S. President Bill Clinton refused the offers.

On February 8, 1988, Mikhail Gorbachev announced that the Soviet Union would withdraw its 100,000 troops from Afghanistan. On May 15, Soviet troops began their ten month withdrawal. Afghanistan was left in virtual anarchy, with nearly one quarter of the population living in refugee camps and infighting among the different factions struggling for power. In April of 1992, Burhannudin Rabbini and his faction took Kabul, thus becoming the dominant power in Afghanistan.

In 1994, the Taliban emerged in Afghanistan, with support from Pakistan, the U.S., Britain, and Saudi Arabia. By 1996, the Taliban had captured Kabul, wresting control of Aghanistan from the Rabbini regime.


WATCH MOVIE:-Ek Musafir Ek Hasina [1962]

Synopsis

On May 15, 1948 a bank in Bombay is robbed. As the masked robbers are making their escape, they are intercepted by a young man. During the scuffle the young man recognizes one of the robbers whom he knew to be the manager of Hotel Continental.........

On May 15, 1948 a bank in Bombay is robbed. As the masked robbers are making their escape, they are intercepted by a young man. During the scuffle the young man recognizes one of the robbers whom he knew to be the manager of Hotel Continental. Mr. Sidhu, However the robbers make good their escape and the badly injured young man is taken to the hospital. The police who are anxious to question him on his regaining consciousness, are taken by surprise when they find the young man cannot remember anything about the Bank robbery. He can remember things upto 14th November, 1947 only, the date on which he as Lt. Ajay Mehra, reached Kashmir to fight the raiders. He further remembers that while saving a girl from the raiders he was hit by a shell and lost consciousness. From thereon, Ajay’s memory is a complete blank. On enquires it is revealed that Lt. Ajay Mehra was in fact reported to be killed in action. His cousin Sunder had taken charge of his wealth and property in Bombay and started squandering Ajay’s wealth over a cabaret dancer Rita employed in Hotel Continental. Sunder is now informed about Ajay Mehra’s safe return and in turn Sidhu also gets this information. Ajay Mehra faces another danger to his life. While the attempt on his life is being made by Sidhu and party, an innocent girl Asha is arrested for an attempt to murder Ajay. The court proceedings against Asha reveal a beautiful love episode which blossomed during the six months of Ajay Mehra’s amnesia condition. Asha through her narration, takes the court to the beautiful valley of Kashmir where Kabailis interrupted the ceremony of her marriage and Ajay Mehra saved her from the bestiy Kabailis. From that day a beautiful take of youthful romance begins till the villians of that episode succeed in getting Ajay arrested as an enemy’s spy and Ajay succeeds in breaking the jail and reaching Bombay in search of his lost identity where he encounters the bank robbers. Ajay is summoned by the Court as a witness. Sidhu and party are in panic. They decide that Ajay will never reach the court alive. While this decision is taken by the gangsters, we see Ajay driving towards Hotel Continental. What happens thereafter to the villains, Ajay Mehra and the innocent and beautiful Kashmiri girl Asha, is worth seeing on the screen.

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